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Smith Ballew to Play for 
1934 Junior Promenade at 
The Middlebury Inn Friday 


VOL. XXX 


fHiddlpburg (Earnpus 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 1933 



No. 27 


Questionnaire Gives 
Opinion Of College 
On Varied Subjects 

Yeomans, Omwake Voted 
Most Representative 
Undergraduates 

CHANGES APPROVED 
IN COLLEGE RULES 

General Election Day Plan, 
Prohibition Repeal, and 
Health Tax Favored 

The Middlebury College student body 
recorded its vote on twenty-three 
questions concerning individuals on 
this campus, changes in administrative 
regulations, and national politics last 
Thursday in the annual CAMPUS 
questionnaire. Tabulated results are 
printed on page 6. 

All of the eight questions on campus 
individuals resulted in the choice of 
seniors. George E. Yeomans and 
Mary K. Omwake won the title of most 
representative undergraduate in each 
college. Donald B. MacLean and Miss 
Omwake were voted the outstanding 
athletes at Middlebury. Edward Yerow 
and Amy Niles scored a majority as 
outstanding non-athletes. The popu¬ 
larity ballot selected Yeomans and Vir¬ 
ginia A. Kent. 

The general election day plan for this 
campus was supported by a vote of 304 
to 216. For the first time in the his¬ 
tory of the questionnaire, the campus 
favored the repeal of the eighteenth 
amendment, and a change in the 
college drinking rule to emphasize con¬ 
duct. There was the usual landslide in 
the men’s college for Dutch dates, with 
an almost equal and opposite swing by 
the women. 

An increased health tax was ap¬ 
proved, but the Kaleidoscope on term 
bills was defeated. Sororities should 
be permitted to pass out of existence 
this spring, according to 326 to 180. 

While 312 students have made definite 
vocational choices, Middlebury has 
affected the decision of only 158. 

Staff Is Announced 
For 1935 Year Book 

Advertising and Circulation 
Departments Include New 
Positions for Assistants 

The staff of the 1935 Kaleidoscope, 
recently appointed by the editor and 
business manager, was announced yes¬ 
terday by Leland O. Hunt, editor-in- 
chief. It includes twenty-eight members, 
in addition to the four elected by the 
class. 

The positions filled are similar to 
those of previous years with the addi¬ 
tion of an associate advertising mana¬ 
ger, two more assistants in advertising 
and one in circulation. 

The complete staff of the book is as 
follows: 

Leland O. Hunt, editor-in-chief: 
Elizabeth W. Higgins, associate editor; 
Arthur H. Williams, managing editor; 
Henry T. Emmons and Rosamond Allen, 
literary editors; Hyatt H. Waggoner 
and Doris P. Tucker, organizations 
editors; Kenneth C. Batten and Vir¬ 
ginia E. Easier, class editors; Arnold 
R. LaForce and Helen L. Lindberg, 
athletic editors; Otto W. Prochazka 
and Janice Orton, art editors; Joseph 
■H. Jackson and Margery T. Hanchett, 
photography editors; and Richard W. 
Cushing and Marjorie Young, feature 
editors. 

Burton C. Holmes, business manager; 
(Continued on page 6) 


Undergraduate President \p 11 D IT 

Will Be Elected Tuesday ^allOWay Daild Is 

A meeting of the undergraduate asso- |7 ] m pki 

ciation for the purpose of electing the UXOPf iPfl I O VXTWT 

president for the coming year will be 1 U 1 i(X J 

held in McCullough gymnasium Tues- T? O •« 11 

day evening at 7:15. fOr 001101 Dali 

Three candidates have been nomin¬ 
ated for this position by a committee of 

seniors chosen for that purpose. They Colored Orchestra, Led By 
are: Charles N. DuBois, Douglas L. 

Jocelyn, and Norman L. Melbye, all Lab S Sister, to Come 

members of the junior class. No proxies r«u:__ 

will be allowed for these elections. P rom CnicagO 

The president of the undergraduate _ 

association is the chief executive office tv A MPT? Th rj tt> tv tkt 

in all activities of the men’s college. H^NUE 1U BE HELD IN 

He is also, ex-officio, chairman of the GYMTSIA^TTTM TTTMTT 10 
student council and a member of the ° U M J UINJ ^ 12 

student life committee. , -- 

The other officers of the organization Pl an<5 f nr Place Flaw 
are elected by the student council from ■ rians tor Llass Day and 

its own membership in the fail. Other Features of Week 

Elizabeth Higgins Is Near Completlon 

Jean Calloway and her twelve piece 
Fnitny* ^avrvnian band, fresh from triumphs in Chicago 

1jUUUI and the middle west, are expected to 

- play at the senior ball June 12. Final 

Robert L Cimhino- anrl PntVi arran e ements have not yet been com- 
KODert L,. L,usning and Kuth pieted but negotiations have been go- 

D. Hanchett Are Elected in S on and Henry L. Newman, chair- 
To Head Business Board T 01 se "‘° r weelt ' an “ clpa,es 

Jean Calloway, younger sister of 
Elizabeth W. Higgins '35 was elected Cab, the famed Harlem rhythm king, 


Blue Key Society to Hold | QQA T.. * - Wppb 
First Formal Dance May 27 1 'S ' JlHilUI VV CCA 

Blue Key society will hold the first \ , * *, * r P T) * 

annual formal dance in its history /\CtlVltl0S 10 DC21I1 
Saturday evening, May 27, according to ° 

announcement last night by Proctor M. TT 1 A £, 

Lovell ’33, committee chairman. l nursday Afternoon 

This formal will be of an exclusive _ 

nature, limited 'solely to members of 

Blue Key and their guests. Smith Ballew’s Orchestra 

Assisting Lovell in making final ar- -p , p, r 

rangements for the dance are Thomas f^ngaged to * lay tor 

J. Duffleld '33, Stephen C. Hoyle ’33, Prom Fridav 

H. Alan Painter '33 and George T. ^ 

Siipola ’33. They have engaged the 

Black Panther orchestra to furnish OPEN HOUSE DANCES 
music. 

A committee was also appointed last WILL BE SATURDAY 

night to superintend the sophomore- __ 

freshman rope pull Friday morning of T 

junior week. This group is composed of Interfraternity Stunts Are 

Thomas R. Noonan '34, Victor J. _ j , t-» r*- 

Riccio ’34 and Walter E. Boehm '35. scheduled to Be Given 

-Tomorrow Night 

Panthers To Meet The 1934 junior week will be launched 

tomorrow at 12:30 when the last morn- 

State Rivals Here For „f pe !' l ? dof 

lour days the college will celebrate 
- this annual event with athletic contests. 

Team to Play Vermont and l 0 '!! 1 , ev , enU5 ’ ai , 1£ ! a welcome vacatlon 

J from lecture and laboratory. 

Norwich in Two Contests Tapping of the 1934 Waubanakee 

On Junior Week Program ZZ^ P ° rter , fl !! d at 2:15 wil1 

J O be the first feature of the program, fol- 

Tlie varsity baseball team will play lowed by a baseball game with Vermont, 


editor-in-chief of the Saxonian at a brings with her twelve negro artists two state series games at Porter field as a tennis match with Boston university, 
meeting of the staff yesterday. At the from the windy city. Working in co- part of the junior week program, meet- and the junior tea dance at the Inn at 
same time, Robert L. Cushing '34 was operation with Hamilton college, New- ing Vermont Thursday and Norwich 4, Tomorrow night fraternity wit will 
made business manager and Ruth D. man has arranged a series of five en- Saturday. shine across the gymnasium footlights 

Hanchett ’34, advertising manager. gagements for the band, and is thus The Panthers, smarting from the re- in the variety show. 

The newly elected board plans to put able to meet the heavy price required. cen t defeat at the hands of U. V. M. Freshman-sophomore wrangling will 
out another issue of the magazine, to Other arrangements for senior week and St. Michael’s, are especially come to a head Friday morning with a 
be published late this month. are rapidly nearing completion. An- anxious to hit their stride and balance rope pull in front of the gymnasium at 

Miss Higgins has been a contributing nouncements have been ordered and their state contest ledger by winning 9:30. "Middlebury Memorabilia”, latest 
editor of the Saxonian for two years, are nearly ready for delivery. All the both contests this week. After playing extravaganza in campus movies, will be 
She is also associate editor of the 1935 traditional features of class day will be careless ball afield and failing to drive released at the playhouse an hour later. 
Kaleidoscope, and was formerly on the retained. back the offerings of Layden, thereby At 2:30 the interfratemity track meet 

CAMPUS news staff. She has been a caps and gowns are being rented by losing to the Catamounts by a 4-0 will be run off on Porter field, while 
member of the English and Spanish the class organization this year, a large count; the Blue and White players Blue and White racqueteers are repell- 
clubs for two years and has qualified surplus in the treasury making this displayed a reversal of form to easily ing Vermont on the Hepburn courts, 
for the dean’s list for the same period, passible. Seniors are requested to wear set back Springfield by the score of 7-2. Friday night, beginning at 9 o’clock. 
She won first prize In the Saxonian them to chapel Sunday, May 21, and Coach Nelson’s men then lost a loosely Smith Ballew, with thirteen artists and 
short story contest this year. Miss 0 n campus throughout the following played game to St. Michael’s to lessen a genuine blues singer, will make music 


(Continued on page 6) 


(Continued on page 5) 


1934 Junior Week Program 


Wednesday 

8:15 p. m.—Dramatic Club play "Fashion” 

Thursday 

2:00 p. m.—Tapping of Waubanakee papooses 

2:15 p. m.—Baseball, Vermont vs. Middlebury 

2:30 p. m.—Tennis, Boston University vs. Middlebury 

4:00 p. m.—Junior tea dance 

7:30 p. m.—Interfraternity variety show 

Friday 

9:30 a. m.—Sophomore-freshman rope pull 
10:30 a. m.—"Middlebury Memorabilia” 

2:30 p. m.—Intramural track meet 

2:30 p. m.—Tennis, Vermont vs. Middlebury 

9:00 p. m.—Junior promenade 

Saturday 

9:30 a. m.—Fraternity breakfasts 
11:00 a. m.—Archery tournament 
2:30 p. m.—Tennis, St. Michael’s vs. Middlebury 
3:00 p. m.—Baseball, Norwich vs. Middlebury 
7:30 p. m.—Open house dances 


Sunday 


5:00 p. m.—Vespers, Dr. Erdman Harris 
7:30 p. m.—Band concert 
9:00 p. m.—Interfratemity sing 


Playhouse 


Porter field 
Porter field 
Hepburn courts 
Middlebury inn 
Gymnasium 


Campus 
Playhouse 
Porter field 
Hepburn courts 
Middlebury inn 

At the houses 
Campus 
Hepburn courts 
Porter field 
At the houses 


Mead chapel 
Campus 
Mead chapel steps 


for the 1934 junior promenade at the 
Inn. Kay Kyser, originally contracted, 
has accepted an engagement on the 
Pacific coast, and will supply the popu¬ 
lar New York orchestra to take his 
place. The Radio Corporation of 
America guarantees the performance of 
Smith Ballew, who comes direct from 
the Hotel Lexington. 

(Continued on page 6) 

“Fashion” Will Be 
Repeated Tonight 

Junior Play is Designed to 
Reflect Mode of Acting 
In Period It Represents 

The second presentation of “Fashion” 
will be given at the playhouse tonight 
at 8:15. The first performance was 
given last night and was well received 
by a large audience. 

This performance has been designed 
to give the production in the theatre 
tradition of the day. It is a serious ef¬ 
fort to reflect the acting mode without 
the use of burlesque and is an attempt 
to stage the play in accordance with 
the custom of the period which it repre¬ 
sents. 

The various scenes are taken from 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Tiffany. 
Between the acts are several songs, 
“Walking Down Broadway”, ”H Etait 
une Bergere ", "Call Me Pet Names” 
and “Don’t Swat Your Mother”. They 
are sung by members of the cast. 

Costuming and designing are main¬ 
tained in the manner prevalent at the 
time at which the play was originally 
presented, the first production being 
given in 1850. 

At commencement the play will be 
presented twice as a part of the senior 
week program. 

The production is being staged under 
the direction of Prof. V. Spencer Good- 
reds, assisted by Emery Hutchins ’34. 






2 


MIDDLI-BURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 1933 


ItlidtllcRiuy (Tiunjnxs 


Formerly 

The Undergraduate 
Founded in 1830 



Member 

National Collegiate 
Press Association 


Entered .is second-class matter, February 28, 191), at the nos 

tufficc at Middlebury, Vermont, 


under the Act of March, 1879. 


SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $).00 A YEAR 


JAMES S. TYLER, 19)4 



Editor-in-chief 


Jam is B. Fish, I 9)4 


Mary K. Carrick, 19)4 

Managing Editor 

ASSISTANT EDITORS 

V/owch's Editor 

Van Beuri n W. Di Vries, 

19)5 

Frances M. Chaiiee, 19)5 

El us K. Haim s, 1 9 1 s 


Mary E. Clark, 1935 

OlTO W. PltOt IIA/KA, |lt., 

19)5 

Doris P. Tucki r, 19)5 


J-oTimop M. Wii.i.is, 19)5 



CARL M. LORENZ, 19)4 



Easiness Manager 


Alice E. Parsons, 19)4 


Charles N. DuBois, 19)4 

Associate Manager 


Advertising Manager 

I.ovina A. Foote., 19)4 


M erie i. F. Willard, 19)4 

Circulation Manager 

ASSISTANT MANAGERS 

Associate Advertising Manager 

Burton C. Holmes, 19)5 


Elizabeth Coley, 19)5 

Pembroke L. Nims, 19)5 


Avis E. Fischer, 19)5 

Robert T. Stai i ord, 19)5 


Miriam E. Smith, 19)5 

Vol. XXX. 

May 10, 193 3 

No. 27 


Poking About 


CALENDAR 


—by Doris G. Anderson 




Wednesday— 


INTERLUDE 

The curtain rises tomorrow at noon on the 1934 edition of the 
annual Junior Week. The regular college routine will be called back- 
stage until Monday morning, and a whirl of social activities and sports, 
bright lights and soft music, will take the stage in a representation of 
student life like that seen only in the Saturday Evening Post and on 
the screen. The hours ahead hold several new features planned by this 
year’s committee which deserve special recognition and commenda¬ 
tion. 

Drastic changes in the usual Junior Week program have been 
effected in order to fit in these new events. This year the celebration 
is prefaced by a dramatic production which dispels every doubt as to 
the traditional excellence of the junior play, setting a new precedent 
in a finished performance, ably executed. It is a successful attempt 
"to give the performance in the theatre tradition of the day (mid¬ 
nineteenth century). . . to reflect the acting mode without burlesque 
. . . and to stage the play in keeping with the theatre practice of the 
period.” This year’s production is conceded to be a most worthwhile 
introduction to the actual Junior Week program. 

Because fraternity informals of a novel nature were felt to be 
the best possible social climax for this brief interlude at Middlebury, 
a plan of open-house dances at all the houses was lecommended to the 
student life committee. The ready acceptance and cooperation by 
that body makes this plan a reality for Saturday night. Past regula¬ 
tions holding couples to one houseparty throughout the evening have 
been replaced by permission to attend any or all the dances, and the 
fraternities have taken an excellent further step in the agreement to 
economize both in music and in attire that evening. Sport dances, 
with the rhythm of radios and victrolas, are distinctly in keeping with 
the democratic spirit of Middlebury and with the spirit of the times. 

Another noble experiment resulted in the reduction of the prom¬ 
enade tax. It has been formerly a six dollar affair and the man who 
permitted his guest to share the expense was considered totally lacking 
in conscience, pride, and even modesty. This year the same dance, in 
the same ballroom, with an orchestra imported from New York, is pre¬ 
sented for five dollars, with the common agreement that'all dates made 
on this campus shall be on a fifty-fifty basis. The net mathematical 
answer cuts the previous prom cost more than in half. Surely this is a 
better solution to the average student’s financial problems than would 
be the actual abolition of the dance, as such colleges as Princeton have 
done this spring! 

Junior Week was originally instituted as a special spring period 
for the entertainment of visitors and prospective students. The Cam¬ 
pus takes this opportunity to welcome all guests who will be intro¬ 
duced for the first time this week to the college on the hill, rich in 
tradition, natural location, and personality. We greet those who know 
Middlebury and are returning once more for this May festival which 
crystallizes college loyalities and decorates her campus for full dress 
parade. 

We believe that this year’s program, combining as it does the best 
features of the past with long awaited improvements and innovations, 
sets a new mark in the achievement of complete enjoyment for the 
greatest number. Guests and students should all find varied enter¬ 
tainment suiting their special interest in the holiday about to begin. 

In spite of the danger of premature praise, we congratulate those 
under whose direction the 1934 Junior Week has been conceived and 
brought to life. With the entire college we share their hope that when 
the curtain rings down Sunday night, it will close up on the most 
successful production ever presented at Middlebury. 


Everything in the Old Chapel Room 
savors of the past, - - everything except 
the' portable blackboard and the papers 
in the drawer of the desk. Even the 
chairs are rather old; the Initials and 
class years carved thereon affirm it. 
The design along the wall is faded and 
obliterated in spots, and the paint is 
peeling off the window sills. The boards 
on the old platform creak and groan, 
because their years are many and num¬ 
berless shoes have left nail-marks on 
their surface. It seems as though the 
spirit of the past haunting the room 
stirs the almost invisible cobweb on a 
brass lamp, and brushes the wings of 
the dead fly on the window sill. 

Even the light of the sinking sun is 
mellow and old when it finally pierces 
the half-opened shutters and the 
window pane, and glows on the var¬ 
nished ship’s steering wheel at the front 
of the room. This wood and metal in¬ 
strument is about six feet in diameter, 
and, as a little round metal trade-plate 
shows, was built by Williamson Brothers 
of Philadelphia. It was used in the 
Spanish-American war to guide the 
good ship “Vermont”. The end of one 
spoke is broken, and one may conjec¬ 
ture as to how it was snapped off. The 
wheel was presented to Middlebury 
College as a souvenir from that war. 

| Another struggle is represented above 
the wheel by the huge marble memorial 
on the wall, presented by the class of 
1904 to honor the sons of Middlebury 
College who gave their lives in the 
Civil war. 

Behind the huge door with its old- 
fashioned lock stands a wood and iron 


silver-mill which was used by Cyrus 
Hamlin, president of Middlebury from 
1880 to 1885. The machine looks like one 
of those antediluvian wash-wringers, 

| except that it is taller and narrower. 

| The iron compression-cylinders still 
; turn, but the heavy nuts and bolts that 
j tighten them are rusted fast. The 
wood upon which it rests is rotted and 
dry and is reenforced by wire. Mr. 
Hamlin rolled out sheets of silver with 
the mill and hammered out spoons and 
cutlery which he sold in order to pay 
his way through Bowdoin college. 

Concealing the silver-mill in its 
shade, a dark, antique secretary-desk 
towers up to one side. This was built 
i by Stephen A. Douglas while he was an 
apprentice in Middlebury. He was 
born in Brandon, and there is a story 
told that when the famous debater was 
a baby, his father died while holding 
him, and the baby rolled almost into 
the fireplace, saved only by the fortun¬ 
ate appearance of one of the neighbors. 
Behind the glassed doors of Douglas' 
desk, repose a German helmet and 
canteen from the World war. Only 
dust and cobwebs remain in the open 
drawers and cupboards. The locks on 
the others are queer-looking but still 
effective. 

Familiar old names on the Middlebury 
campus find their origin under some 
of the pictures on the walls. On the 
front wall to the left of the middle 
picture is a portrait of Rev. Charles 
Marsh Mead, and directly above the 
secretary-desk is one of John G. Mc¬ 
Cullough. There are also portraits of 
presidents and of students who have 
won fame in numerous fields. 


8:15 p. m. 

Thursday— 

12:30 p. m. 
2:15 p. m. 

2:30 p. m. 


4:00 p. m. 
7:30 p. m. 

Friday— 

10:30 a. m. 

2:30 p. m, 
2:30 p. m. 
9:00 p. m. 

Saturday— 

2:30 p. m. 

3:00 p. m, 
7:30 p. m. 

Sunday— 

5:00 p. m. 

7:30 p. m. 
9:00 p. m, 

Monday— 


Tuesday— 

7:15 p. m. 

8:00 p. m. 


| s 

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hred 

mu mu inii ii. 

TUTT TTMT-TTI7T TTITT TT 

s and 

1A AUAA Hull. Hill 1UU 

nr Tinr-MHT nm mu nn» him hut miittiih hut tut* ts - 

Patches j 

—by L. Judson Morhonse j 

mu mu mu nm nut mu mu mu ilia silla aiua a. .. , ( 


Golf, Middlebury vs. Nor¬ 
wich, there. 

‘•Fashion” at the play¬ 
house. 

Junior Week begins. 
Baseball, Middlebury vs. 
Vermont, Porter field. 
Tennis, Middlebury vs, 
Boston university, Hep¬ 
burn courts. 

Junior tea dance at the 
Middlebury inn. 
Interfraternity variety 
show at the gymnasium. 

Middlebury movies at the 
playhouse. 

Intramural track meet, 
Porter field. 

Tennis, Middlebury vs. 
Vermont, Hepburn courts, 
Junior promenade at the 
Middlebury inn. 

Track, E. I. C. A. A. at 
Worcester. 

Tennis, Middlebury vs. 
St. Michael’s, Hepburn 
courts. 

Baseball, Middlebury vs. 
Norwich, Porter field. 
Open house dances at all 
fraternity houses. 

Vespers, Dr. Erdman Har¬ 
ris of New York city. 
Band concert, campus. 
Interfraternity and inter¬ 
sorority sing, chapel steps. 

Senior reading period be¬ 
gins. 

Undergraduate association 
elections, gymnasium. 
Recital by Elly Delfs in 
Mead memorial chapel. 


Notice 

All students who wish to use type¬ 
writers in the June examinations are 
asked to make application at the 
registrar’s office not later than Wednes¬ 
day. May 24. 


With Junior Week starting tomorrow 
we hereby impart a bit of our cher¬ 
ished advice to imported females. If 
i you’re on a blind date, remember he is 
too. If he doesn't send you flowers 
j for the Prom don’t give that frigid smile 
for the first two hours. He probably 
had to borrow money from everyone in 
the class even to take you. Midd co-eds 
t know this and if they don't, they're 
j some lucky. If you have to walk a 
i little, try to bear it. All the walking 
! you'll do will be relaxation for him 
1 after climbing around on this moun¬ 
tain, day in and day out. You quite 
I possibly have been asked because you’re 
a mite better looking than the average. 
Remember the illusion begins to wear 
off about Saturday night or Sunday 
morning unless you have something in 
, that bump behind them rosy cheeks. If 
he wants to show you Passion Puddle, 
let him. What's in a name? And lastly, 
if your telephone rings after your date 
lias bidden you a tender goodnight, 
lock your door, throw the key out the 
: window and bury your head in the 
1 pillows. Heed all this well, and you'll 
| be back for another dance before the 
I year is out. 

In this column last week we started 
and finished a campaign on the lan¬ 
guage of the brats about town, which 
brought forth comment from one of the 
I women who has an office in Painter. 
Charity starts at home and according 
to afore mentioned comment, some of 
these days one of you lads is liable 
to get your mouth washed out with soap. 

' Thanks to the martyr who threw the 
pail of water, the whining tenors and 
gurgling baritones who mixed it up in 
filonit of Starr last week didn’t sing 
quite all night, The Otter Valley Hill- 
Billies were good for a while and the 
singing was a welcome diversion but 
even Methuselum loses the old charm 
after twelve o'clock. 

For those who have anything to do 
with cutting grass on the campus we 
would like to say that the only way to 
have grass cut is oflf. When they get 
that forest out in front of chapel hacked 
down we expect to see the dead bodies 
of all those dogs we’ve been missing 
for our morning worship. 

The victory over Springfield was a 
large feather in the caps of the baseball 


team especially since Springfield nearly 
upset Vermont. We noticed some of 
the visitors barging about with Midd 
co-eds and from all appearances the 
local talent was appreciated. We have 
often wondered how a ball player gets 
to first base and goes about stealing 
second. 

The sign-out sheet in girls dorms has 
caused us no end of cogitation, especial¬ 
ly when the lassies sign out for “enter¬ 
taining”. In the first place, we’re not 
sure that they really are, and in the 
second place, it looks like the diary of a 
night club hostess, or the confessions of 
a chorus girl. 

One slightly married couple was 
nearly scared out of a year’s chapel 
cuts last Saturday night while walking 
past the grave yard. They were boldly 
discussing ghosts and had just admitted 
a rather uneasy feeling at the spook¬ 
iness of the place by moonlight when 
suddenly they heard the most unearthly 
scream that ever came out of one of 
Lon Chaney’s thrillers. One tenth of 
one second later they were well past 
fraternity row on the way home. 

Our shoe-shopperies had a hard day 
of it recently trying to find some white 
shoe blacking for a red-headed cus¬ 
tomer. No, not black shoe polish, but 
white shoe blacking. Oh well, live and 
learn. We never even thought there 
was any such thing. 

So hoop-skirts are back, but only 
for the play. Some of the lads are 
complaining already about being bom 
forty years too late. Anyway, it would 
be a good garb to wear when smuggling 
a case of scotch into the room, and the 
only place to hide an Austin safely. 
Hoops, my dear. 

The women’s glee club was given a 
real treat when they went to Water- 
bury to broadcast last week. Besides 
being shown through the spacious stu¬ 
dios. they watched a typical program. 
The Bar-X cowboys dashed off a few 
numbers and from all accounts they 
looked just like they sound if you’re 
unfortunate enough to have heard. 

Introducing a new plan for late news 
flashes, we have a snazzy bulletin of 
general interest: The stomach of Angus 
MacTavish Plimpwalker Pratt no longer 
drags. (Nice having the CAMPUS 
printed next door to what house?) 


CAMPUS Notice 

The CAMPUS announces the election 
of the following members of the class 
of 1936 to its news staff: William H. 
Carter, Clarence W, Harwood, Jack 
Steele, Martin J. Tierney, Fred E. Weed, 
Dorothy B. Chamberlin, Isabel H, 
Davies, Velma S. Sutliffe, Frances M. 
Wilkinson, and Mary A. Williams, 


Dr. John M. Thomas 
Speaker At Vespers 

Former President Advises 
Taking Aim of Life That 
Psalmist Has Described 

Dr. John M. Thomas '90 of Mont¬ 
pelier, former president of Middlebury 
College, spoke at vespers Sunday. His 
topic, the aim of life and the means 
of obtaining it, was based on the first 
Psalm. 

The speaker began by saying that no 
one asks to be born here, but once boro, 
he has an instinct to prolong his life. 
Every separate tissue cell works for 
health and growth. “It is natural, 
therefore," he added, “that we should 
calculate as to how long we may live. 

“With such a long span before us, it 
behooves us to make the life adven¬ 
ture good, both for ourselves and for 
others.” Dr. Thomas spoke of the 
1 people who find life wonderfully good, 
and of the honest means of being able 
to find it so. 

‘‘The Psalmist,” continued the speak¬ 
er, “divides all people into two classes, 
the righteous and the ungodly, and 
exhorts us to seek the counsel of the 
godly, which is not to be rejected as an 
old tradition." The reason is that 
such principles did not merely happen 
to be, but have had a long history of 
trial and error, and it is wise to follow 
the great "standard moralities”. 

“As the contractor plans a schedule 
for building, so must life be planned.’’ 
advised the speaker, “and the aim 
must be development of character, not 
merely the weeding out of hindering 
forces, but the growth of positive traits." 







MIDDLEBURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 193 3 







Left to right: Assistant Manager Matteson, Rudd, Volkmar, LaForce, Flagg, 
Loomis, Captain Allen, Manager Clemens, Coach Cornwall. 


Thomas J. Duffield John F. Hartrey 


Campus Honor Roll 

Each year the Campus recognizes effort and 
attainment in service to Middlebury by publish¬ 
ing an honor roll of outstanding members of the 
graduating class, selected by the dean of men, 
the president of the junior class and the editor 
of the Campus. 


VARSITY BASEBALL TEAM 


Stephen C. Hoyle 


George E. Yeomans 


Donald B. MacLean 


Edward Yerow 


VARSITY TENNIS TEAM 


VARSITY GOLF TEAM 


Left to right: Olson, Pickens, Captain Riccio, Lccte, Manager Spragg. 


Anthony G. L. Brackett Clark H. Corliss 


Henry L. Newman H. Alan Painter 


Walter J. Nelson 
Varsity Baseball Coach 


Left to right, front row: Bona, Hoyle, Lccte, Ruggeri, Meacham, Bakcy, Rob¬ 
erts; second row: Coach Nelson, Stevenson, Dumas, Yeomans, Captain Hartrey, 
Stefaniak, Williams, Davis, McDermott; back row: Guild, Zawistoski, Hoehn, 
Anderson, Olson, Barker, Benson, Ziegler, Manager Green. 


John F. Hartrey 
Varsity Baseball Captain 


m 

















MIDDLEBURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT„ MAY 10, 193 3 



',*.**■ 






1934 JUNIOR WEEK COMMITTEE 


Louis M. Baumgartner 
1934 Junior Week Chairman 


Chari.es N. DuBois 
Junior President 


Left to right, front row: Miner, DeBold, Sargent, DuBois, M. Smith, Baum¬ 
gartner, Bland, Jocelyn, D. Smith, Tyler, Sweet; second row: West, Wunncr , 
Bowcrman, Seckerson, Bump, Webb, Foote, Tufhill, Nothnagle, Wilson, Moore; 
back row: C. B. Hickcox, Reid, Patterson, Aalto, Munford, Howie, Cushing, 
L. E/nbler, Harris. 


Thomas R. Noonan 
Editor-in-Chicf 
1934 Kaleidoscope 


Ralph H. Dumas 
Business Manager 
[934 Kalei closer> pc 


Clara W. White 
Associate Editor 
1934 Kaleidoscope 


Glenna M. Bump 
Associate Manager 
1934 Kaleidoscope 


Old Chapel from Lower Campus 



Donald B. MacLean 
President of Waubanakee 


A View of the Mountain Campus 


tLAlXNt U. Ul’DYKE 

President of Mortar Board 


















MIDDLEBURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 1933 


3 


Samuel Board Concludes 
Vocational Conferences 

Mr. Samuel S. Board, director of the 
yale graduate placement bureau, com¬ 
pleted his vocational conferences here 
last Thursday and Friday. 

These conferences were arranged pri¬ 
marily for the benefit of those seniors 
who were unable to secure interviews 
during Mr. Board’s four day visit in 
January. Individual problems of gra¬ 
duate study, occupations, and em¬ 
ployment were taken up. 

The vocational adviser came to Mid¬ 
dlebury through the efforts of Edgar J. 
Wiley, director of personnel, and the 
undergraduate committee on vocational 
guidance. While in Middlebury last 
January, Mr. Board gave fifty individual 
interviews to upperclassmen and con¬ 
ducted a series of talks and discussion 
groups. 


INFORMALS 


Chl Psl 

An informal dance was given Satur¬ 
day evening at the Chi Psi lodge. 
Thirty couples danced to the music of 
victrola and radio. 

The chaperons were Prof, and Mrs. 
Ennis B. Womack and Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard L. Brown, 

Kappa Delta Rho 

Kappa Delta Rho gave an informal 
dance at the house Saturday evening. 
Victrola and radio furnished music for 
the dancing of forty couples. 

The chaperons were Prof, and Mrs. V. 
Spencer Goodreds and Mr. and Mrs. 
Edgar J. Wiley. 


Jig-saw puzzles measure general abili¬ 
ty, challenge skill, intelligence, and 
persistence, according to a psychology 
professor at Drake university. 


English Department Notice 

Office hours of members of the Eng¬ 
lish department during the reading 
period will be as follows: 

Professor Beers, Old Chapel 16, Mon¬ 
day, Wednesday, and Friday, 11:30 to 
12; 3:30 to 4:30; Tuesday and Thursday 
by appointment. 

Mr. Brown, Old Chapel 20, Monday, 
Wednesday, and Saturday, 12 to 12:30; 
Tuesday and Thursday, 2 to 2:30; Fri¬ 
day, 1:30 to 2:30. 

Professor Cady, Old Chapel 19, Tues¬ 
day, Thursday, and Saturday, 10:30 to 
12 and by appointment. 

Mr. Hammond, by appointment in 
Old Chapel 16; Daily 8 to 10 p. m. in 
26 Hepburn. 

Professor Owen, Old Chapel 14, 
j Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 9 to 
ill; Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday 
9 to 10. 

Professor Perkins at his home daily 
1 to 1:30. 


HUYLER’S 

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Mothers’ Day 
May 14 

Remember Mother with 
HUYLER’S 

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BENI’S 

HIGH-HATTERS 

Modem Rhythm for Your House 
Dances 

Telephone 43 Telephone 281 


Fordham University 
School of Law 
New York 

Case System - - Three-Year Course 


Co-educational 


College Degree or Two Years of College 
Work with Good Grades Required 

Transcript of Record Necessary in 
all Cases 

Morning, Early Afternoon and 
Evening Classes 


Write for Catalogue 

CHARLES I’. DAVIS, Registrar 
233 Broadway, New York 


Patronize Our Advertisers 



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M1DDLEBURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 1933 


Final Meeting of German 
Club Held Friday Evening 

Twenty members of the German club 
competed In a poetry reciting contest 
at the final meeting held Friday even¬ 
ing In Pearsons social hall. 

Nine prizes were awarded according 
to the number of years which the en¬ 
trants had studied German. The win¬ 
ners were as follows: first year students: 
Abraham Manell '34, first; Edith Doug¬ 
lass ’34, second; Charles H. Startup 
’36, third; and Dorothy E. Williams 
’35, fourth; second year students: 
Marguerite C. Foster '33, first; Dale B. 
Pritchard ’35. second; and Rachel C. 
Heaid ’33, third; third year students: 
Stuart Whitaker '36, first, and Alice 
E. Cooke '35, second. 

The rest of the program consisted of 
reports of the club's activities for the 
past year, violin selections by Mr. 
Fritz Tiller, and group singing of 
German songs. Refreshments were 
served. 


Prof. W. S. Barrage Gives Reading At 
Last English Club Meeting of Year 

The last regular meeting of the Eng¬ 
lish club for the year was held at the 
home of President and Mrs. Paul D. 
Moody Wednesday evening, May 3. 

Selections from “The First Mrs. 
Fiaser", by St. John Greer Ervine, were 
read by Prof. William S. Burrage. Re¬ 
cently elected members attended this 
meeting. 

A short business meeting of the club 
| will be held soon for the purpose of 
! electing officers. 

Dr. Erdman Harris, Professor at Union, 
To Be Speaker at Vespers Next Sunday 

The speaker at the vesper service 
Sunday afternoon will be Dr. Erdman 
Harris, a member of the faculty of 
Union theological seminary, New York 
| city. 

Dr, Harris is a graduate of Prince¬ 
ton university and of Union, and has 
been professor of English in the 
American missionary school at Cairo, 
Egypt. He has recently been preach- 
1 ing in New York city. 


Beta Kappa Holds Formal 
Dance at Middlebury Inn 

Epsilon of Beta Kappa held its an¬ 
nual formal dance Saturday evening 
at the Middlebury inn. Thirty-six 
couples danced to music furnished by 
“Duke" Milne and his orchestra of 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

Guests from other fraternities were: 
Harthon L. Bill ’33, Ross G. Cunning¬ 
ham '33, John F. Hartrey '33, Stephen 
C. Hoyle '33, Charles L. Ingersoll '33. 
Proctor M. Lovell '33, Douglas F. Short 
’33, and Ralph C. Whitney '33. 

The patrons and patronesses were 
Prof, and Mrs. Vernon C. Harrington, 
and Prof, and Mrs. Julius S. Kingsley. 

At CUSHMAN’S 


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The National Bank 
of Middlebury 

A Century of Service 

Without a Loss to Any 
Depositor 

CONFERENCE 

How to Meet the College Graduate’s 
Financial Problems. Mrs. V. M. Wheat, 
Director of The New York School of 
Secretaries, 342 Madison Avenue, New 
York City, invites you to participate in 
person or by mail. The meeting will 
be held on Saturday, May 13, at 2:30 
o’clock. If unable to attend, send your 
inquiries or suggestions for impersonal 
discussion. The Conclusions of the 
meeting will be forwarded to you. 


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MIDDLEBURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 1933 


5 


Track Team Scores 
Over Montreal AAA 


Lovell Sets New Record in 
Javelin Throw as Panther 
Defeats Canadians 90-45 

Scoring eleven first places to four for 
their opponents, Middlebury’s well- 
balanced track team earned its second 
victory of the season, drubbing the 
Montreal A, A. A. team 90 to 45 Satur¬ 
day at Porter field. 

Favored by splendid weather, the 
meet produced some performances that 
were extremely creditable for the 
never-too-favorable track. One record 
was broken, that by Lester Lovell, who 
created a new college standard in the 
javelin throw with a fine heave of 181 
feet. 

The quarter mile run and the two 
mile run were the highlights of the 
meet from a competitive standpoint. 

In the 440, Hughes of Montreal, one of 
the. best middle-distance men in the 
Dominion, staged a thrilling dual with 
Hoxie until the home stretch, when the 
Canadian weakened and allowed Hoxie 
to win, with Boehm coming up fast to 

pass Hughes and just miss catching j ^Tuisle" wiih Higgins/c^ain* of 
Ho^e. The time, 52.6, was exceptional the Union squad . The Qther Blue and 

for the track. 1 White victory came in the doubles when 

^ Allen and Flagg defeated Higgins and 

Walroth in another close battle. 


Tennis Team Defeats R. P. I. 
But Bows to Union on Trip 

The Middlebury tennis team won one 
match and lost one on its first trip 
of the year. Friday the netmen de¬ 
feated R. P. I. at Troy, 5-4, in a meet 
featured by a close match between 
Flagg, playing number one for Middle¬ 
bury, and Root, R. P. I. number one 
man. The Middlebury representative, 
after dropping the first set, was finally 
victorious to provide what proved to 
be the winning margin. 

The summary: 

Flagg <M) defeated Root (R), 3-6, 6-0, 
6-4; Allen (M), defeated Hazenbuck 
<R), 6-1, 6-2; LaForce (M) defeated 
Wurder (R), 6-4, 0-6, 7-5; Daniels (R) 
defeated Rudd (M), 7-5, 6-3; Loomis 
<M> defeated Lanzolatta (R), 8-6, 6-1; 
Zwickel (R) defeated Tierney (M), 
6-8, 6-3, 6-2. 

Allen and Flagg (M) defeated Root 
and Hazenbuck (R), 6-2, 6-1; Daniels 
and Wurder <R) defeated LaForce and 
Rudd (M), 7-5, 6-3; Lanzolatta and 
Setophen (R) defeated Loomis and 
Tierney (M), 6-1, 6-3. 

The following day, Saturday, the 
team journeyed to Schenectady, where 
they met defeat at the hands of a strong 
Union team 7-2. Captain Allen scored 
Middlebury’s lone singles victory in a 


Tennis Team To Play 
Three Matches Here 


Netmen Will Meet Boston 
University, Vermont, and 
St. Michael’s This Week 

As their contribution to the Junior 
Week festivities, the Middlebury tennis 
team will participate in three home 
matches in as many days. Tomorrow 
the Blue and White netmen will meet 
Boston university, Friday they will play 
Vermont, and Saturday will bring St. 
Michael's to the Hepburn courts. 

The B. U. match will find the Pan¬ 
thers favored to repeat their victory of 


U. V. M. AND NORWICH Twpnfv DnP Tr> 

TO INVADE DIAMOND 1 Went y Une Men 1 ° 

(Continued from page 1) Enter E.I.C.A A. Meet 

further the chances for winning the I 

state championship. j - 

Middlebury’s lineup for the approach- Prospects for Successful 
ing games will probably be about the j OUmiMnn' Rrin-tif A 1 

same as that used in recent contests. ! Showing Bright Although 

Barker will probably get the twirling) Freshmen Not Competing 
assignment against Vermont Thursday ' 
if his injured back is sufficiently re¬ 
covered. Stefaniak is scheduled to pitch 
against the Soldiers on Saturday, 

Either Yeomans or Stevenson may see 
service at third base and Dumas, Wil¬ 
liams and Bakey are fighting for the 
two outfield positions with Barker or 
Stefaniak holding down right field. 

The Catamounts have played only 


last year, despite the fact that the ! ga ™ , si " Ce Cutting out the Pan- 

1 thers. Playing steady ball behind 


around among Gale of Montreal, Cush 
man of Middlebury, and Sears, with all 


The summary: 


three closely grouped until the last, Walrottl (U) defeated Flagg (M)t 6 _ lf 
lap. On the last circuit Gale held first 


position, and began to sprint. Follow¬ 
ing close on his heels was Sears, and the 
two raced away from the rest of the 
field. Rounding the last turn the slight 
form of the bespectacled Sears gather¬ 
ed itself for his bid, and the amazed 
Gale was passed as though he were 
standing still, the Panther runner win¬ 
ning easily. 


6-3; Allen (M) defeated Higgins (U), 
6-4, 5-7, 7-5; Minch (U) defeated La¬ 
Force (M), 6-3, 6-4; Griffith (U), de¬ 
feated Rudd (M), 6-1, 10-8; Keats (U) 
defeated Loomis (M), 6-3, 6-1; Iverson 
(U), defeated Tierney (M), 6-1, 6-2. 

Allen and Flagg (M) defeated Wal¬ 
roth and Higgins (U), 5-7, 6-4, 6-1; 
Minch and Moffatt <U) defeated La¬ 
Force and Rudd (M) 6-3, 4—6, 6-1; 
Griffith and Chrysler (U) defeated 


The summaries: 

100 yard dash: won by Cady (Midd.); I Loomis and Tierney (M), 7-5, 6-2. 

Crabtree (Mont.), second; Jocelyn) - 

(Midd.), third. Time, 10.2 seconds. 

120 yard high hurdles: won by Mac- 
Lean (Midd.); Worral (Mont.), second; 

Roberts (Midd.), third. Time, 15.8 
seconds. 

220 yard dash: won by Montgomery 
(Midd.); Simpson (Mont.), second; Pro- 
chazka (Midd.), third. Time, 23 seconds.. 


Varsity Golfers Win Over 
Union 6-0 on Home Course 

Middlebury easily defeated Union in 
a golf match Saturday at the country 
club, winning every match for a 6-0 
score. All the Panther golfers were in 
excellent form, with Leete starring with 
220 yard low hurdles: won by Worral j a 71 for the course. 


Bostonians are rated as being stronger , 
than last season. Against the Green ; 
and Gold racqueteers from U. V. M. 

Middlebury will be out to avenge two „ .. ,, . „ 

defeats suffered at their hands last : ^ ° the Vermont pUching staff, wil 
twi-, a m rnuic i probably be on the mound for the visi 


Beckley they defeated Springfield by 
a 7-3 count Saturday to run their win¬ 
ning streak to four games. Layden, the 

ill 


year, both by 4-3, This match should 
again be close. 

St. Michael’s does not seem to be a 
very dangerous threat to the Blue and 
White Saturday. Last season Middle¬ 
bury defeated the Winoski team, 6-0, 
and should repeat. Both the Vermont 
and St. Michael’s matches are state 
contests. 

After the Junior Week campaign, the 
netmen will rest for three days before 
meeting St. Lawrence next Wednesday, 
at home. Last year the New Yorkers 
fell before the Middlebury racquets, and 
another win seems probable. 

In all probability the Blue and White 
will be represented in the coming 
matches by the same men who played 
against Union and R. P. I., with Flagg 
playing at number one, Captain Allen 
at two, and LaForce, Rudd, Loomis, and 
Tierney filling the other positions. 


(Mont.); MacLean (Midd.), second; 

Roberts (Midd.), third. Time, 25.4 
seconds. 

440 yard run: won by Hoxie (Midd.); 

Boehm (Midd.), second; Hughes 
(Mont.), third. Time, 52.6 seconds. 

880 yard run: won by Forbush 
(Midd.); Hunter (Midd.), second; Hoxie 
(Midd.), third. Time, 2:07.2. 

Mile run: won by Seymour (Midd.); 

D. Short (Midd.), second; Davies 
(Mont.), third. Time, 4:40.8. 

Two mile run: won by Sears (Midd.); 

Gale (Mont.), second; Cushman 
(Midd.), third. Time, 10:32. 

Shot put: won by Janakka (Mont.), and secre t a ry-treasurer of the “M" club 
Franklin (Mont.), second; Brown 


Summaries: 

Riccio (M) defeated Hummer (U), 

1 up; Leete (M) defeated Horvath 
(U), 6 and 5; Pickens (M) defeated 
Grosbeck (U), 1 up; Olson (M) defeated 
Mitchell (U), 2 up. Riccio and Leete 
(M) defeated Hummer and Horvath 
(U), 5 and 4; Pickens and Olson (M) 
defeated Grosbeck and Mitchell (U), 

2 and 1. 


Sweet and Whitney Chosen 
To Be “M” Club Officers 

Richard B. Sweet ’33 and Raymond 
L. Whitney ’35 were elected president 


Intramural Baseball 

Delta Kappa Epsilon decisively won 
the intramural baseball championship 
by defeating Alpha Sigma Phi by a 
5-2 score in the finals Monday. The 
winners had previously defeated Beta 
Kappa and Chi Psl to qualify for the 
final. In the battle for third and fourth 
places Sigma Phi Epsilon yesterday de¬ 
feated the Chi Psi nine 12-2. 

DKE 16 - CP 5 

The strong DKE outfit swamped Chi 
Psi in the semi-final by a 16-5 count 
last Wednesday. Five runs for DKE 
in each of the first two frames left 
little doubt as to the final outcome. The 
losers’ tallies were scattered, although 


Coach Brown will take twenty-one 
men and Manager Newman to Worces¬ 
ter for the E. I. C. A. A. track meet 
this Saturday. This is a larger squad 
than has been taken during the past 
few years, but prospects for a success¬ 
ful showing appear bright. 

Freshmen are ineligible to compete 
in this meet so the Blue and White 
will be without the services of several 
athletes who were point winners in the 
past meets. 

Among the teams which will probably 
compete are Connecticut Agricultural 
college, Massachusetts State, Rhode 


Island State, Tufts, Worcester Poly- 
tors Thursday. He baffled the Midd technic, Norwich, and Middlebury. 
batters and yielded only three hits in ! MacLean, Lovell, Sears, and Cady 


the last encounter and the Panthers 
will have to get accustomed to his 
slants in order to win the coming con¬ 
test. 

Little is known about the Norwich 
team. They lost to Northeastern by a 
9-2 count in their only game this season. 
Comi pitched steady ball for the Cadets, 
allowing only six hits but his team¬ 
mates committed nine errors to ruin all 
chances of victory. If the Norwich 
players have unproved their work in 
the field they may prove to be dan¬ 
gerous opponents. 


appear to be the best bets for Middle¬ 
bury. MacLean will be especially strong 
in the high hurdles while Sears should 
provide plenty of opposition in the dis¬ 
tance races. Captain Brown will be 
handicapped by his bad leg and may 
not even compete. 

The following men are making the 
trip: Manager Newman, Brown, Jillson, 
MacKenzie, MacLean, Montgomery, 
Roberts, Short. Erkkila, Jocelyn, Lovell, 
Sears, Sweet, Seymour, Watson, White, 
Boehm, Cady, Hunter. Lombardy, 
Mathewson, Prochazka, and Whitney. 


Panther Swamps Springfield 7-2 
But St. Michael’s Edges 9-8 Win 

The Middlebury College baseball team Purrington, Hartrey. Stolen bases: Ober, 
defeated Springfield 7-2 in the first Stefaniak, 2, Purrington, Lewis. Runs 
home game of the season at Porter | batted in: Bakey 2, Zawistoski 3, 
field Friday. Nicking Elliot for thir- ; Sorensen 1. Umpires: Hayden and 


teen hits, the Panthers had little 
difficulty in subduing their highly tout¬ 
ed rivals who were able to garner only 
four hits off Stefaniak. 

Captain Hartley's home run in the 
sixth inning was the highlight of the 
game while Zawistoski led the winners' 
batting attack with three hits in three 
trips to the plate. Purrington, Spring- 
field catcher, hit a double and a single 
in four times at bat to score one run 
for the losers. 

Wells opened the game for Spring- 
field with a run on an error. Steven¬ 
son evened the score by crossing the 


they pounded out eleven hits to the j pi a t e 0 n a hit by Sorensen. Middle- 


winners' fourteen. MacKenzie was out¬ 
standing for DKE with three hits, while 
Ziegler and Amelung knocked out three 
each for Chi Psi. 

Score by innings: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7—T 

DKE .-.5 5 2 0 0 0 4—16 

CP .---1 0 2 0 2 0 0—5 


bury’s' next attack came in the third 
inning w'hen Hoehn, Barker and Bakey 
added counters on a double by Bakey 
and a single by Zawistoski. Hartrey 
scored on a homer in the sixth and 
Springfield again counted when Lewis 
came in on Rappuzzi’s fly over center. 


(Midd.), third. Distance, 38 feet. 

Javelin: won by Lovell (Midd.); 
Janakka (Mont.), second; Erkkila 
(Midd.), third. Distance, 181 feet. 
(New college record). 

Pole vault: won by Doyle (Mont.); 


at a meeting of the organization Mon¬ 
day night. They succeed Proctor M. 
Lovell ’33 and Ralph H. Dumas ’34. 

Sweet was a member of the fresh¬ 
man football team and has played var¬ 
sity basketball for three years. He is 
captain-elect for 1933-34. He is also 


MacKenzie (Midd.), second, Logan j on team and is Delta Kappa 

(Mont.), third. Height, 11 feet, 6 inches. 1 ElDsdon 

Whitney played football his fresh- 


Hammer throw: won by Watson 
(Midd.); Whitney (Midd.), second; 
Janakka (Mont.), third. Distance, 118 
feet, 1 inch. 

High jump: won by Worrall (Mont.); 
MacLean, Brown, and Jillson (Midd.), 
tied for second. Height, 5 feet, 10 inches. 

Discus throw: won by Lombardy 
(Midd.); Whitney (Midd.), second; 
MacLean (Midd.), third. Distance, 113 
feet, 6 Inches. 

Broad jump: won by Cady (Midd.); 
Crabtree (Mont.), second; Jillson 
( Midd.), third. Distance, 21 feet 2 
inches. 


WITH OUR OPPONENTS | 

Boston U. 5 

Upsala 3 

Upsala 5 

Lowell textile 1 

Vermont 7 

Springfield 3 

Springfield 8 

St. Michael’s 1 

Holy Cross 6 

Tufts 4 

Providence 5 

Holy Cross 2 

Boston U. 7 

Brown 1 

Bowdoin 13 

Northeastern 11 

Tufts 8 

Bowdoin 4 

v-— _ 

-—- 


man year and was on the varsity the 
past season. He is also a trackman and 
is affiliated with Chi Psi. 


Batteries: Goering, House and Mac- i Bakey and Dumas completed the scor- 
Kenzie; Reid, Ziegler and Ziegler, La- ing on a two bagger by Zawistoski. 
Bounty. Umpires: Bowker and Wissler. Box score: 

DKE 5 - ASP 2 j Middlebury 

Delta Kappa Epsilon clinched its in- , ab 

tramural championship by defeating ! Stevenson, 3b ...4 
Alpha Sigma Phi 5-2 in a close final ! Hoehn, lb.4 


Connelly. Time of game, 2:10. 

St. Michael’s 9, Middlebury 8 
The Blue and White nine met its 
second disaster in the Green Mountain 
Conference series by losing to St. 
Michael’s 9-8 in a loosely played con¬ 
test at Winooski Monday. Although the 
Panthers picked up twelve hits, Col¬ 
ville kept them scattered well enough 
to make the scoring difficult. 

Scoring three runs by Crosbie, Tionan 
and Coleville in the first inning, St. 
Mike's coasted through on the lead 
adding one run in the second and two 
in the third and fourth stanzas. Zawis¬ 
toski scored for Middlebury in the third 
and fifth innings while Barker started 
a rally in the eighth which lasted until 
six more runs had been chalked up for 
the losers. 

Box score: 

Middlebury 


ab 


Annual Intramural Track 
Meet Will Be Held Friday 

The annual intramural track meet 
will be held Friday at Porter field. Pre¬ 
liminaries and semi-finals will take 
place at 9:30 a. m. and the finals will 
be run off at 2:30 p. m. Each fraternity 
may enter three men in each event 
except the half-mile relay, in which 
each may enter a team of four men. 

Entries must be filed at the office of 
the director of athletics not later than 
5 p. m. Thursday, May 11. Substitutions 
will be allowed at the start. Trials will 
be held in the runs and hurdles. 

The events making up the meet are: 
120 yard dash, 120 yard low hurdles 
(at high hurdles distance), high jump, 
shot put, and half-mile relay race. A 
first place counts five points; second 
three, and third, one. 


Totals.29 7 

Springfield 


Monday. Both outfits played air tight , Barker, rf_3 

ball for the first two innings. ASP broke Sorensen, 2b _2 

the deadlock in the last of the third Bakey, If_3 

with the first run of the game. The Dumas, cf_3 

victors came back strong, however, and Zawistoski, ss_3 

crossed the plate live times in the four Hartrey, c ..4 

remaining stanzas. MacKenzie starred stefaniak, p_3 

for the winners with two singles and a 
homer, while Lyon knocked out two 
hits for the ASP outfit. The winners 
made eight hits to the losers seven. 

Score by innings: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7—T 

DKE _0 0 0 2 1 1 1—5 

ASP.0 0 1 0 0 0 1—2 

Batteries: Goering and MacKenzie; 

Bona and Benson. Umpires: Bowker 
and Wissler. 

SPE 12 - CP 2 

Sigma Phi Epsilon defeated Chi Psi 
12-2 yesterday to take third position 
in the intramural league. Taking ad¬ 
vantage of numerous errors, the SPE 
aggregation started off with five hits 
and five runs in the first inning, and 
easily held Chi Psi to two counters. 

Springstead pitched a fine game for the 
winners, allowing only six hits. Ke'.ley 
and Startup were outstanding with 
three hits each. 

Score by innings: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7—T 

SPE_--5 5 0 0 0 2 0—12 

CP .0 0 0 0 2 0 0-2 

Batteries: Springstead and DeVries; 

Scozzafava, Caron and Whitney. 


po 

1 

12 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

6 

1 


Stevenson, 3b_4 

Yeomans, 3b_1 

Hoehn, lb_5 

1 Barker, rf_5 

e i Sorensen, 2b_5 

1 Bakey, If_5 

1 1 Dumas, cf _5 

0 ; Williams, cf_0 

0 | Guild, cf_0 

0 1 Zawistoski, ss_4 

Hartrey, c_4 

McDermott, p_0 

Stefaniak, p.3 


13 27 13 


ab r 


Ober, cf _3 

Brown, lb ..3 

Wells, 2b _4 

Purrington, c_4 

Dean, rf..4 

Lewis, 3b.1 

Wetterling, ss-3 

Rappuzzi, If_3 

Elliott, p -.-.2 

" Mason _1 

Totals_28 


po 

0 

0 

7 

0 

2 

2 

1 

0 

0 

5 

6 
1 
0 


Totals.-41 8 12 24 12 

St. Michael’s 

ab r h po a 

Corcoran, cf_5 112 0 

0 1 Crosbie, 2b _4 110 2 

1 Tionan, c_5 2 2 6 0 

1 Ruggiero, ss_5 113 5 

1 Coleville, p_5 3 2 1 2 

0 Miles. If .5 12 2 3 

1 BourgoLs, 3b _5 12 2 3 

0 Gustavus, lb_4 0 2 11 0 

0 Diford, rf _4 0 10 0 

0 Meade, If_0 0 0 0 0 

0 _____ _ 


4 24 17 


* Batted for Wetterling in the seventh 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9—T 

Springfield_1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0—2 

Middlebury_1 0 3 0 0 1 2 0 x—7 

Two base hits: Stevenson, Bakey. 
Purrington. Home run: Hartrey. 
Double plays: Stevenson and Hoehn. 
Left on bases: Springfield 3, Middle¬ 
bury 6. Bases on balls: off Elliott, 
1; off Stefaniak, 1. Struck out, by 
Stefaniak: 6; by Elliott, 5. Passed balls: 


Totals.42 9 14 27 13 4 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9—T 

Middlebury..0 0 1 0 1 0 0 6 0—8 

St. Michael's.3 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 x—9 

Two base hit: Hartrey. Three base 
hits. Ruggiero, Hartrey, Zawistoski. 
Stolen bases: Stefaniak. Hits: off Mc¬ 
Dermott, 6 in three innings; off Ste¬ 
faniak. 8 in five innings. Struck out: 
by Coleville, 6; by McDermott, 1; by 
Stefaniak, 4. Bases on balls: off Mc¬ 
Dermott, 1; off Stefaniak, 1. Losing 
pitcher, Stefaniak. 





















































6 


MIDDLEBURY CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VT., MAY 10, 1933 


RESULTS OF CAMPUS QUESTIONNAIRE 


Note: The following classification symbols are used: M33 for senior men, 
W36 for freshman women etc., MT for men's total, WT for women’s total, UNC 
for unclassified, and GT for grand total. 


Question Classified Returns 



M33 M34 

M35 

M36 MT W33 

W34 

W35 

W36 WT UNC 

GT 

1. Most representative man 











Yeomans ._ 

... 26 37 

30 

32 

125 

36 

33 

39 

55 

163 

45 

333 

Jocelyn ... 

_ 1 3 

3 

11 

18 

3 

7 

11 

3 

24 

5 

47 

Corliss_ 

_ 9 3 

4 

1 

17 

4 

2 

1 

0 

7 

3 

27 

2. Most representative woman 











Omwake .. 

_ 15 20 

12 

11 

58 

29 

10 

15 

18 

72 

18 

148 

Ball_ 

_ 2 4 

6 

2 

14 

4 

4 

7 

12 

27 

3 

44 

Wheaton .. 

_ 6 8 

3 

5 

22 

0 

7 

0 

9 

16 

5 

43 

3. Outstanding man athlete 











MacLean .. 

_ 30 32 

30 

55 

147 

19 

21 

19 

39 

98 

37 

282 

Yeomans .. 

_18 24 

18 

7 

67 

16 

17 

37 

23 

93 

20 

180 

Hoyle _ 

... 2 0 

0 

0 

2 

2 

2 

2 

0 

6 

3 

11 

4. Outstanding woman athlete 










Omwake .. 

_21 10 

12 

11 

54 

21 

20 

33 

20 

94 

23 

171 

Wilson_ 

_ 6 9 

14 

14 

43 

13 

13 

7 

27 

60 

11 

114 

Major_ 

_ 3 10 

4 

3 

20 

8 

12 

3 

8 

31 

5 

56 

5. Outstanding man non-athlete 










Yerow_ 

_ 18 15 

13 

15 

61 

26 

27 

39 

31 

123 

22 

206 

Newman_ 

_13 20 

4 

15 

52 

9 

6 

5 

2 

22 

7 

81 

DuBois .... 

_ 4 7 

12 

15 

38 

1 

5 

1 

0 

7 

8 

53 

6. Outstanding woman non-athlete 










Niles.. 

... 17 16 

24 

5 

62 

7 

6 

3 

20 

36 

10 

108 

M. P. Hall . 

.. 3 7 

3 

1 

14 

19 

21 

29 

10 

79 

9 

102 

McNeely .. 

_ 0 0 

0 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

13 

19 

4 

23 

7. Most popular man 











Yeomans .. 

... 20 28 

26 

19 

93 

11 

21 

28 

33 

93 

26 

212 

MacLean .. 

.. 2 2 

3 

7 

14 

5 

0 

1 

10 

16 

3 

33 

Corliss .... 

_ 5 6 

5 

3 

19 

4 

3 

2 

2 

11 

1 

31 

8. Most popular woman 











Kent. 

_ 4 7 

7 

4 

22 

2 

2 

13 

8 

25 

10 

57 

Wilson _ 

_ 6 3 

8 

4 

21 

1 

3 

8 

11 

23 

7 

51 

Bland - 

_ 3 2 

1 

3 

9 

0 

8 

7 

17 

32 

7 

48 

9. Faculty member whom Middlebury could least afford to be without 



Cook . _ 

..11 7 

15 

1 

34 

17 

28 

18 

5 

68 

14 

116 

Bryant _ 

_12 19 

16 

2 

49 

5 

3 

4 

1 

13 

10 

72 

Owen - 

_ 6 7 

0 

5 

18 

0 

5 

10 

15 

30 

7 

55 

10. Do you favor general election day? 









Yes .. 

_ 40 46 

28 

39 

153 

30 

24 

29 

30 

113 

38 

304 

No.. 

__21 18 

23 

26 

88 

17 

19 

30 

35 

101 

27 

216 

11. Are there too many student organizations 

at Middlebury? 




No ... 

_ 34 34 

30 

53 

151 

29 

32 

51 

61 

173 

51 

375 

Yes. 

_ 28 25 

18 

9 

80 

19 

15 

7 

4 

45 

13 

138 

12. Do you 

favor a universal system of 

Dutch 

dates? 






Yes _ 

... 50 50 

42 

46 

188 

19 

12 

18 

23 

72 

40 

300 

No _ 

_ 12 14 

10 

13 

49 

26 

35 

40 

38 

139 

24 

212 

13. Do you prefer pass-fail to the present grading system? 





Yes _ 

.. 37 32 

29 

28 

126 

24 

26 

28 

41 

119 

28 

273 

No .. 

_ 26 33 

23 

34 

116 

24 

21 

32 

25 

102 

40 

258 

14. Should Kaleidoscope be added to college term bills? 






No _ 

_ 35 36 

24 

35 

130 

34 

21 

26 

25 

106 

44 

280 

Yes _ 

.. 27 30 

28 

28 

113 

14 

25 

34 

41 

114 

25 

252 

15. Do you 

favor increased health 

tax 

to include 

free 

physician and 

Porter 

hospital service? 











Yes _ 

... 46 35 

35 

31 

147 

44 

38 

51 

39 

172 

34 

353 

No _ 

-.. 15 30 

17 

32 

94 

4 

8 

9 

27 

48 

32 

174 

16. Should 

the eighteenth amendment be repealed? 






Yes _ 

.. 35 47 

35 

49 

166 

23 

22 

25 

39 

109 

42 

317 

No _ 

..27 17 

16 

15 

75 

24 

22 

35 

29 

110 

23 

208 

17. Should the college drinking rule be changed to emphasize conduct? 



Yes _ 

_ 39 37 

24 

30 

130 

25 

21 

30 

35 

111 

32 

273 

No _ 

..27 28 

26 

29 

110 

17 

20 

24 

28 

89 

33 

232 


Yes _46 

39 

22 

26 

133 

36 

43 

32 

44 

155 

38 

326 

No _ 15 

20 

27 

32 

94 

11 

4 

26 

19 

60 

26 

180 

19. Outstanding world figure in politics today? 







Roosevelt ..27 

30 

25 

34 

116 

16 

15 

19 

12 

62 

27 

205 

Hitler _ 23 

16 

14 

15 

68 

21 

12 

13 

31 

77 

20 

165 

MacDonald ...._ 7 

8 

5 

7 

27 

3 

4 

10 

9 

26 

7 

60 

20. Outstanding world figure in economics today? 







Roosevelt _12 

15 

5 

10 

42 

12 

7 

6 

7 

32 

13 

87 

Chase__ 6 

4 

8 

1 

19 

3 

4 

8 

0 

15 

3 

37 

Young ... .. 0 

1 

0 

11 

12 

1 

2 

0 

11 

14 

7 

33 

21. Should the United States recognize Soviet Russia? 






Yes _ ... . _46 

43 

28 

37 

154 

34 

36 

39 

32 

141 

42 

337 

No ....13 

19 

19 

24 

75 

3 

6 

16 

29 

54 

21 

150 

22. Have you made a definite vocational choice? 







Yes _ . _37 

40 

29 

35 

141 

37 

37 

40 

25 

139 

32 

312 

No _ . 22 

24 

23 

29 

98 

10 

10 

20 

39 

79 

34 

211 

23. Has Middlebury affected your decision? 








No ___ _34 

33 

33 

41 

141 

35 

28 

37 

48 

148 

32 

321 

Yes ___21 

29 

16 

15 

81 

12 

17 

18 

7 

54 

22 

157 


1935 KALEIDOSCOPE 
STAFF IS APPOINTED 

(Continued from page 1) 

Miriam E. Smith, associate manager; 
Robert T. Stafford, advertising mana¬ 
ger; Avis E. Fischer, associate adver¬ 
tising manager; Carroll L. Beers, Lester 
H. Benson, W. Wyman Smith, and Mar¬ 
garet T. Whittier, assistant advertising 
managers; Frank S. Janas, circulation 
manager; Gertrude E Knight, associate 
circulation manager; and Chester E. 
Billington, Russell A. Clark, Philip H. 
Mathewson, Louise T. Feather, and Lois 
Mack, assistant circulation managers. 

ELIZABETH HIGGINS 
TO HEAD SAXONIAN 

(Continued from page 1) 
Higgins is a member of the choral club 
and served on the soph hop committee, 
and is Delta Delta Delta. 

Cushing has been assistant business 
manager of the Saxonian for the past 
year. He was also business manager of 
the Freshman Handbook, and is a 
member of Delta Upsilon. 


Sleeveless Sweaters 
95c to $1.95 
F. S. EDWARDS 

Men’s Shop 

DYER’S 

Featuring 5c and 10c 
Articles 

Try Our Fresh 
STRAWBERRY 
SUNDAE 

Middlebuy Fruit Co. 

Day and Night Service 

Rates Reasonable 

MARK TURNER 

TAXI SERVICE 
25 cents a Passenger 
Phone 64 Middlebury, Vermont 


PROM TO FEATURE 
1934 JUNIOR WEEK 

(Continued from page 1) 
Fraternity breakfasts will be served 
to brothers and their guests at 9:30 
Saturday morning. The annual spring 
archery tournament will be held on 
campus at 11, with trophies awarded to 
the best exponents of Diana. 

. The most striking innovation of the 
entire week will take place Saturday 
evening, when the eight fraternities at 
Middlebury will entertain at open house 
dances. Couples will be free to visit 
any or all houses during the evening, 
clad in informal sport attire. 

The regular Sunday vespers at 5 will 
have as speaker Dr. Erdman Harris, of 
Union Theological seminary.' The col¬ 
lege band plans a concert for Mead 
chapel steps at 7:30, after which the 
interfraternity sing will close the 1934 
junior week with bars of close harmony. 


OPERA HOUSE 


WEEK OF MAY 10th 


WEDNESDAY, May 10— 

John Bowles and Nancy Carroll in 
CHILD OF MANHATTAN 
Sally Eilers in 
SECOND HAND WIFE 

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, 
May 11 and 12 

Helen Hayes and Clark Gable in 

THE WHITE SISTER 

News 

Matinee Friday at 3 O’clock 


SATURDAY, May 13— 

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Betty Davis 
in 

PARACHUTE JUMPER 

News and Comedy 


MONDAY, May 15- 

President Roosevelt in 
THE FIGHTING PRESIDENT 
George Sidney and Charles Murray in 
COHENS and KELLYS in TROUBLE 


TUESDAY, May 16- 

Geo. Raft in 

PICK UP 

Paul Lukas and Loretta Young in 

GRAND SLAM 



CHIC FOOTWEAR 


If you are particular about 
Style and Quality 
in the shoes you wear 
then you need look no further 

Queen Quality gives you 
both. 

$5.00 Up 

THE EMPORIUM 
For 

MOTHERS’ DAY 
Send Her 
CHOCOLATES 

Just received a large fresh variety in 
fancy and plain boxes of all sizes. We 
have the kind she loves best. Look’em 
over now. 

New Vermont Maple Sugar 
and Syrup 

at a very reasonable price 

CALVI’S 

for QUALITY 


4 ‘The Grey Shop” 

DON’T FORGET MOTHER ON HER 
DAY, SUNDAY, MAY 14th 

Gifts Suitable for Mother 

DOROTHY E. ROSS 


NEW LINEN SUITS 
NEW WHITE 
FLANNELS 

FARRELL’S 

“Where Midd Men Meet” 


KODAK FINISHING 
Prompt Service 
and 

Highest Quality 

FRAMED CAMPUS 
VIEWS 

GOVE’S 

Up Stairs It Pays to Climb 

Have You Seen the New 
Alice in Wonderland 
Bandeau? 

We have them in plain for 50c and in 
the fancy at 75c. 

As Advertised in Vogue 



Send Her a Message on 

Mothers’ Day 


by 

POSTAL 

TELEGRAPH 

Telephone 360 

Amplifier for Dances 

Reasonable Rates 

Townley’s Radio and 
Sound Services 

Phone 402-2 


Accomodations at 
THE GABLES 

Don’t forget your aim to 
give your guest the best at 
Reasonable Prices. 

Call 395 or See Miss Elsie C. Verfenstein 
at 7 Weybridge Street 

RAIN COATS 
by U. S. Rubber Co. 

New Deal Prices 

GEO. N. SHAMBO 

THE BETTER PLACE TO SHOP 

NEW HAIR STYLES 

Our Experts Create New 
Beauty for Milady 

Middlebury Barber 
and Beauty Shop 

AT THE INN 
Norman G. Nadeau, Prop. 

Phone 298 Middlebury, Vt. 

FOR JUNIOR WEEK 

Dresses, Lingerie, Hosiery, 
Shoes 

Flannel Pants, Dress Shirts, 
Knickers, Sweaters. 

STORE-WIDE SALE STARTS 
THURSDAY 

Middlebury Supply Co. 

Tlie Store at Railroad Bridge 



A 

DOUBLE GIFT for 

Mother’s Day 


Delicious Gales chocolates for 
enjoyment . . . with a beautiful 
Cara Nome Compact for re¬ 
membrance attached to the 
package. A gift that mother 
will appreciate. 

The candy is all her favorites 
— each piece coated with vel¬ 
vety sweet chocolate. 

Gales 

Mother’s Day 
Package 

One lb. 

$1.50 

Two lbs. 

$2.50 

H. M. LOUTHOOD 


SAVE with SAFETY at 
DRUG STORE 


TUFTS COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 

Founded 1900 

Dentistry has developed into an important 
branch of health service. In order to meet 
its obligation to humanity, it needs men 
and women of the highest intellect, backed 
by superior training. 

College men and women who are inter¬ 
ested in a career in this field of work may 
obtain a prospectus of the educational re¬ 
quirements by addressing 
Howard M. Marjehison, D. M.D., Dean 
Tufls College Dental School 
416 Huntington Ave. Bo.ton, Mass. 


NEWSPAPER 

MAGAZINE AND PRIVATE 
SECRETARIAL TRAINING 
THREE MONTHS COURSE 
New York School of Secretaries 
342 Madison Ave., N. Y. C. 
Van. 3-4039 


Look! Student Look! 

I advertise my price and not my 
material. Why? Because I stand back 
of my customers 100% for their satis¬ 
faction. My prices are lower than any 
other shop. Let me repair your shoes 
at this low price. 

Men’s Rubber Heels and Soles, 
Less than $1.00 

Ladies’ Leather Heels and Soles, 
Less than 90c 
SHOE SHINE 5c 

Middlebury Cut Rate 
Shoe Repairing 
Shop 

4 College Street 

Middlebury Vermont 


Shingles Framed 
at Special Rates 
Gardner J. Duncan 

Antiques 

67 Main Street 

Middlebury Vt 


BARBER SHOP 

New ,Modem, Up-to-Date Two-Chair 
Shop 

Over the Central Vermont Public 
- Service Corporation 

Lewis and Denton